Tag Archives: Glenn Triest

A Fashionable Ending

12 Apr

Retail maven and fashion icon Linda Dresner closed her Motown store recently. Linda was a “Stylemaker,” when I was editor of Style magazine (now defunct). As I wrote several years ago, she exudes a quiet elegance just like her posh stores. She previously had a retail establishment in New York, which closed in 2008.

Linda has a passion for making women look beautiful. Her store in Birmingham, Mich., was minimalistic in black and white and like her clothing, it never seemed dated. As she stated in a New York Times article, she just didn’t feel comfortable renewing her lease at her age.

Many fashion designers owe Linda’s fashionable eye to their successful beginnings. She was the first retailer to highlight Jil Sander, Claude Montana, Commes des Garcons and Yohi Yamamoto in the Detroit area.

Her store closing is a loss to all fashionistas, but let’s look forward to the next fashion icon retailer. If you know of anybody, please let us know.

And to Linda. . .You are always in vogue!

Photos by Glenn Triest

My Al Kaline Moment

9 Apr

When I was editor of Style magazine (no longer published), our team picked 20 iconic Detroit Stylemakers for the 20th anniversary issue.

I had the opportunity to interview Al Kaline in 2005. He chose Comerica Park, the home of the Detroit Tigers. We met in the stands, while the team practiced. He was nice, gracious and humble. He talked about how much he loved baseball and the Detroit Tigers. In 2005, he was the special assistant to Dave Dombroski, then president of the Detroit Tigers.

But in his opinion, his proudest accomplishment was not his baseball prowess — it was being married 50 years to his high school sweetheart. We both teared up when he said it.

The photo above is a picture from the magazine.

What a special baseball player and special person!  RIP no. 6.

 

Photography by Glenn Triest.

My Date with Elmore

2 Sep

photo (1)

In 2005, I was the editor of “Style,” a Detroit lifestyle magazine. For our 20th anniversary issue, our staff picked 20 Detroit Stylemakers — people who imprinted their singular style on Motown.

Elmore Leonard was certainly a Stylemaker, and I wanted to interview him. I knew he lived in suburban Detroit so I reached out  the best way I could to this established writer. I wrote him a letter, but unfortunately I never received a  response. When I heard he loved flowers and was a master gardener, I had another idea. I sent him an orchid  via the local florist with my business card attached. He called and agreed to an interview and a photo session. It helped that the photographer, Glenn Triest, photographed him previously. He had one caveat — he asked if I would drive him to the photo session.

The following week, I was in Elmore’s house. He showed me the orchid,  his living room with a simple wood desk and  his notes — all on yellow legal paper written out in long hand.

He mentioned his upcoming research on German prisoners of war in the United States. I mentioned that Glenn’s family was from Germany, and that Glenn’s father had quite a story — leaving Germany as a teen, fighting in World War II, becoming a translator for the Nuremberg Trials and finding surviving family members.

Elmore was intrigued, and when we arrived at the photo shoot he was excited to speak to Glenn. Glenn prepared his studio like a movie set filming a crime scene. The mood was dark, the lights were dim and broken glass littered the floor. Elmore was in his element.

We all had the best time. I heard about Elmore entertaining Quentin Tarantino and Aerosmith and how Elmore has no idea what the ending of his stories are until he ends it!

Glenn mentioned that there will be a movie premiere about his father, Howard Triest, at Oakland University. The movie, “Journey to Justice” featured Howard’s historic footage shot in 1947, Glenn’s still photography and the plight of the Triest family fleeing Germany. “I’d love to see it,” said Elmore. “It’s a date,” I added.

The following week my husband and I picked up Elmore and his then wife at his home and went to Oakland University for the showing. Elmore was gracious, humble and, of course, interesting. A few people came up to him and asked for his autograph. He graciously signed it and gave good wishes to all the aspiring writers.

It was a special evening. When I heard about his death last week, I thought about my date with Elmore.

Many obits were written, but I especially liked Bill Shea’s tribute in Crain’s Detroit Business with this headline: “Crime Paid: Dickens of Detroit is gone, but legacy will continue to make a killing.”

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