Archive | September, 2013

Bravo to Gail Simmons

24 Sep

photo-4

TV personality Gail Simmons talks with her mouth full, and she admits it. In fact, her newest book is Talking with My Mouth Full: My Life as as Professional Eater.  Simmons spoke at the Greater Detroit Chapter of Hadassah’s Opening Luncheon. She is featured in the photo with Detroit Chapter President Joan Epstein (left). The Canadian-born foodie studied anthropology but found her way to the magazine world by writing restaurant reviews. She is currently  the Special Projects Director  of Food & Wine magazine. Since 2006, she has been the host and judge of Top Chef. She credits her rise to fame due to her love of food.

Advertisements

Goodfellows Breakfast

23 Sep

securedownload

No kid should ever be without a Christmas. That’s the motto of the Old Newsboys’ Goodfellow Fund of Detroit. This year’s annual breakfast tribute honored Peter Karmanos Jr., the recently retired CEO of Compuware. Pete is a visionary and philanthropist along with his wife Danialle. The breakfast was held at the renovated Cobo Hall with beautiful vistas of the Detroit River. The choir from the Detroit Academy of Arts and Sciences entertained the crowd. In the top right photo Karmanos is with some of the students. Carmen Harlan and Devin Scillian from WDIV TV (top right) introduced Karmanos. In the lower left photo, Fox2 Detroit TV Anchor Huel Perkins interviews Mayor Dave Bing.

Special Quilts

14 Sep

Diptic

In the last month, there are two special quilts I would love to share. The one on the left is part a national AIDS exhibit. It happens to be at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak this week. It’s the weekend of the annual AIDS Walk  in Detroit. The AIDS quilt is a powerful visual reminder of the beloved people who lost their battle to AIDS. The colorful quilt on the right is one I purchased from designer Martha Butch who owns  the store Front Porch Quilts located in Troy, Mich. This quilt is perfect for my granddaughter. I just love the animal pattern.

My Date with Elmore

2 Sep

photo (1)

In 2005, I was the editor of “Style,” a Detroit lifestyle magazine. For our 20th anniversary issue, our staff picked 20 Detroit Stylemakers — people who imprinted their singular style on Motown.

Elmore Leonard was certainly a Stylemaker, and I wanted to interview him. I knew he lived in suburban Detroit so I reached out  the best way I could to this established writer. I wrote him a letter, but unfortunately I never received a  response. When I heard he loved flowers and was a master gardener, I had another idea. I sent him an orchid  via the local florist with my business card attached. He called and agreed to an interview and a photo session. It helped that the photographer, Glenn Triest, photographed him previously. He had one caveat — he asked if I would drive him to the photo session.

The following week, I was in Elmore’s house. He showed me the orchid,  his living room with a simple wood desk and  his notes — all on yellow legal paper written out in long hand.

He mentioned his upcoming research on German prisoners of war in the United States. I mentioned that Glenn’s family was from Germany, and that Glenn’s father had quite a story — leaving Germany as a teen, fighting in World War II, becoming a translator for the Nuremberg Trials and finding surviving family members.

Elmore was intrigued, and when we arrived at the photo shoot he was excited to speak to Glenn. Glenn prepared his studio like a movie set filming a crime scene. The mood was dark, the lights were dim and broken glass littered the floor. Elmore was in his element.

We all had the best time. I heard about Elmore entertaining Quentin Tarantino and Aerosmith and how Elmore has no idea what the ending of his stories are until he ends it!

Glenn mentioned that there will be a movie premiere about his father, Howard Triest, at Oakland University. The movie, “Journey to Justice” featured Howard’s historic footage shot in 1947, Glenn’s still photography and the plight of the Triest family fleeing Germany. “I’d love to see it,” said Elmore. “It’s a date,” I added.

The following week my husband and I picked up Elmore and his then wife at his home and went to Oakland University for the showing. Elmore was gracious, humble and, of course, interesting. A few people came up to him and asked for his autograph. He graciously signed it and gave good wishes to all the aspiring writers.

It was a special evening. When I heard about his death last week, I thought about my date with Elmore.

Many obits were written, but I especially liked Bill Shea’s tribute in Crain’s Detroit Business with this headline: “Crime Paid: Dickens of Detroit is gone, but legacy will continue to make a killing.”

Mara Movies

Fun, Fashion, Frivolity: An insider guide to Metro Detroit and beyond

snapshotsincursive

Interesting stories about everyday moments.

Motown Savvy

Fun, Fashion, Frivolity: An insider guide to Metro Detroit and beyond

lark & linen

interior design blog

Chevrons & Éclairs

Fun, Fashion, Frivolity: An insider guide to Metro Detroit and beyond

Mara Movies

Fun, Fashion, Frivolity: An insider guide to Metro Detroit and beyond

snapshotsincursive

Interesting stories about everyday moments.

Motown Savvy

Fun, Fashion, Frivolity: An insider guide to Metro Detroit and beyond

lark & linen

interior design blog

Chevrons & Éclairs

Fun, Fashion, Frivolity: An insider guide to Metro Detroit and beyond

Mara Movies

Fun, Fashion, Frivolity: An insider guide to Metro Detroit and beyond

snapshotsincursive

Interesting stories about everyday moments.

Motown Savvy

Fun, Fashion, Frivolity: An insider guide to Metro Detroit and beyond

lark & linen

interior design blog

Chevrons & Éclairs

Fun, Fashion, Frivolity: An insider guide to Metro Detroit and beyond

%d bloggers like this: